The Blubber Blues

A Humpback Whale lazily rolled onto its side exposing the tips of its tail and fin, a pair of Bottlenose Dolphins leapt from inside a wave breaking over a hidden reef.

We donned mask and snorkel, leaping in among the jellies to be engulfed in another world. We were surrounded by bluish pulsating ephemera reflecting the sun’s rays as if they were lit by neon.

These Blue Blubber Jellies are a familiar sight in Australia. Summer winds blow offshore conveying cold water from the deep and bringing with it rich nutrients and a blossom of plankton and algae - a feast for jellies.  The water was apple green, we could hardly see the bottom beyond a few metres. A couple of turtles drifted past, shadows through a fog.

We were here to film with Tim Jack Adams (Watersports Guru), a local conservationist, surfer and all round watersport enthusiast. Tim had an epiphany years ago while snorkelling here with clients. They approached a large Loggerhead Turtle, close to 80 years old by its size, swimming near the surface. A number of plastic bags were stuffed in its mouth, the turtle was struggling and died shortly afterwards. Tim says it was a moment that changed his whole life. 

Tim was instrumental in setting up the Marine Action Conservation Society (MACS), a positive action group that takes school kids and tourists out to see turtles and get involved in campaigning for better management of plastics in our ocean. As we snorkelled with Tim and colleague Mick Manley, we gathered a plastic bag as invisible to us among the jellies as it would be to a Loggerhead.

A colleague called from the vessel nearby "there's a shoal of Kingfish heading towards you!". Sure enough, under the surf where breaking waves where throwing bubbles of oxygen into the water, these predatory fish along with Giant Trevally, were cruising back and forth.

On the surface nearby were a few hundred Hutton's Shearwaters, attracted inshore by this mobile patchwork of life. Hard to imagine that a few weeks ago, these small seabirds were enduring freezing Antarctic seas and raising young in snow-covered holes in the ground on New Zealand's South Island. Despite the welcome warmth of Australia's subtropical coastline, tropical oceans are not always this bountiful - hopes are the birds were sleeping off a hearty feed from the night before.

For the guys at Watersports Gurus, this was one of the less successful days they've had at Cook Island. Just imagine what an awesome day with a glistening clear ocean and teeming marine life would look like - it's another day in the office for Tim and his mates. 

 

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To find out more about Tim's trips click here http://wildiaries.com/tours/73-Turtle-Snorkel-With-the-Watersports-Guru. To keep up to date with the filming of this series, enter your email in the form below.


We donned mask and snorkel, leaping in amongst the jellies, becoming engulfed in an other-world. We were surrounded by bluish pulsating ephemera that reflected the sun’s rays as if they were lit by neon.

These Blue Blubber Jellies are a famiiiar site in Australia. They gather as the summer wind blows offshore, conveying cold water from the deep, bringing with it rich nutrients and a blossom of plankton and algae. The water was apple green and we could hardly see the bottom beyond just a few metres. A couple of turtles drifted ominously past as shadows through a fog.

We were here to film with Tim Jack Adams (Watersports Guru), a local conservationist, surfer and all round watersport enthusiast. Tim had an epiphany years ago while snorkelling here with clients. They approached a large Loggerhead Turtle near the surface only to find it had eaten plastic ... it died shortly afterwards. Tim says "this moment changed my whole life. I realised I had to do something".

Tim was instrumental in setting up the Marine Action Conservation Society (MACS), a positive action group that takes school kids and tourists out to see turtles and get involved in campaigning for better management of plastics in our ocean. As we snorkelled with Tim and colleague Mick Manley, we gathered a plastic bag as invisible to us amongst the jellies as it would be to a Loggerhead.

A colleague called from the vessel nearby "there's a shoal of Kingfish heading towards you!". Sure enough, under the surf where breaking waves where throwing bubbles of oxygen into the water, these predatory fish along with Giant Trevally, were cruising back and forth.

On the surface nearby were a few hundred Hutton's Shearwaters, attracted inshore by this mobile patchwork of life. Hard to imagine that a few weeks ago, these small seabirds were enduring freezing Antarctic seas and raising young in snow-covered holes in the ground on New Zealand's South Island. Despite the welcome warmth of Australia's subtropical coastline, tropical oceans are not always this bountiful - hopes are the birds were sleeping off a hearty feed from the night before.

As we headed back to shore, a Humpback Whale lazily rolled onto its side exposing the tips of its tail and fin - it was only just beyond the surf break - and a pair of Bottlenose Dolphins leapt from inside a wave breaking over a hidden reef.

For the guys at Watersports Gurus, this was one of the less successful days they've had at Cook Island. Just imagine what it would be like normally!

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Episodes of this nature series will be broadcast online in 2013. Follow the team’s discoveries around Australia by entering your email address here